What Tikva Users Have To Say


I have been taking these ingredients for over 1 year now.  It has been great!

My blood pressure went from 160/101 to 115/75.  My total cholesterol went from over 300 to 201.  This all happened in less than 6 months after taking these ingredients.  

Carter R.


My husband and I wanted to let you know what our experience with these ingredients has been, even at this early stage. This Wednesday marks 4 weeks on the drink.

Daniel is 42. His health is good except for the high blood pressure. He's been on Lisinopril and Indapam for about two years. He became a living zombie. It was a struggle for him some days to get the dishes washed and unload the dishwasher. He had almost every side effect listed for these drugs. In looking back, we realized that he is someone that is extremely sensitive to medicine and responds very quickly to them (either way).

We received the shipment on Wednesday, March 16th, and he began taking it.
His energy began coming back the following Monday, and has remained (and gotten better).

On Friday, April 1 he had to
stop taking the diuretic medicine because his blood pressure was dropping too low. Once this diuretic was stopped, everything leveled out within the target range.

He began having another symptom of skin rash/eczema and I got on the Internet to find out more about ACE inhibitors. Once we found out it was based on the venom of a Brazilian pit viper snake, the symptoms he's been experiencing were completely understandable.

He's now cut his ACE inhibitor in half, and is still in the target range on the blood pressure. We feel like that with a bit more time on the formula, he will be off of these medicines.

These ingredients have given me my husband back.

Thank you so much!

Best regards,
Ann and Dan R .



I am 45 years old and have been diagnosed with having high blood pressure (150 over 93). Because of my medical plan changing I have seen several different doctors, over a 2 year period, all are family practitioners. Each doctor prescribed different blood pressure medicine which I took and followed there direction. I saw no difference in my blood pressure. My biggest problem was with the side effects of each drug.

Then my life changed when I started taking these ingredients. I have seen my blood pressure drop to 125 over 79 in 2.5 months. I no longer take blood pressure prescription medication and my doctor considers my blood pressure to be normal, I agree. Thank you.

Brent M.


Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

Promotes Proper Function Of The Heart & Nervous System
Improves Immunity
Guards Against Congestive Heart Failure




What Is It?

As the first B Vitamin to be discovered, thiamin can rightly claim the name of vitamin B1. This nutrient is essential to normal growth and development. It participates in converting the carbohydrates from foods into energy and promotes proper functioning of the heart and nervous systems.

There are still groups at risk of developing a thiamin deficiency: older adults and alcoholics in particular. There are also certain ailments for which extra thiamin can be beneficial. For example, thiamin supplements may help to guard against a thiamin deficiency caused by taking diuretics, a standard treatment for congestive heart failure. Thiamin may lessen numbness and tingling in individuals with diabetes and other disorders that can cause nerve damage. Thiamin has shown promise in treating a number of other disorders, including depression, anxiety, and stress.

Because it works synergistically with other B vitamins, it's best to get thiamin as part of a B-complex supplement rather than on its own.

Whole Health MD

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Health Benefits

 

Anti-Stress Vitamin And Immune System Enhancer

Similar to some other B complex vitamins, thiamine is considered an "anti-stress" vitamin because it is believed to enhance the activity of the immune system and improve the body's ability to withstand stressful conditions.

University of Maryland Medical Center

Heart failure

Thiamine may be related to heart failure in two ways. First, low levels of thiamine may contribute to the development of congestive heart failure (CHF). On the flip side, people with severe heart failure can lose a significant amount of weight including muscle mass (called wasting or cachexia) and become deficient in many nutrients. It is not known whether taking thiamine supplements would have any bearing on the development or progression of CHF and cachexia. Eating a balanced diet, including thiamine, and avoiding things that deplete this nutrient, such as high amounts of sugar and alcohol, seems prudent, particularly for those at the early stages of CHF.

University of Maryland Medical Center

A third of patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure are deficient in vitamin B1

A study published in the January 17, 2006, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reported that approximately one out of three patients hospitalized with heart failure have deficient levels of thiamin, also known as vitamin B1. According to the authors of the report, a deficiency of thiamin manifests as heart failure symptoms and may worsen pre-existing disease. The study is the largest to date of thiamin deficiency among individuals hospitalized with heart failure.

Mary E. Keith, PhD of St Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues at St Michael's and the University of Toronto, measured thiamin levels among 100 heart failure patients and compared them with those of 50 healthy subjects. They found a deficiency of the vitamin in 33 percent of the heart failure patients compared to 12 percent of those without the disease. Dr Keith commented, "We found that one-third of congestive heart failure patients admitted to our hospital had red blood cell levels of thiamin that were lower than normal and would suggest deficiency. In contrast to some previous studies, we did not find a relationship between the development of thiamin deficiency and the amount or duration of diuretic use and urinary thiamin excretion. In fact, what was important was that a relatively small dose of thiamin from a multivitamin was protective against developing thiamin deficiency."

Dr. Keith observed that heart failure may increase the body's need for certain nutrients, so that even individuals with healthful diets may still come up short on vitamin B1. "Physicians and the public have exclusively focused on drug therapy to the detriment of at least one of the foundations of good health-appropriate nutrition," she added.

—D Dye 

Life Extension Foundation

 

The information herein is not intended to replace the medical advice of your physician. You are advised to consult with your physician with regards to matters relating to your health, and in particular regarding matters that may require diagnosis or medical attention. DO NOT stop taking medications without first consulting with your physician. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided herein is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. Heart 2 Heart of America does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. This informational resource is designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/ or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. Heart 2 Heart of America does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Heart 2 Heart of America compiles. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.